Katie Hammond Research Center Superintendent
Northwest Research and Education Center

Northwest Georgia Research and Education Center

300 Battey Farm Rd NE, Rome, GA 30161

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Our Work and Priorities

The Northwest Georgia Research and Education Center's 905 acres of land provides the opportunity to perform valuable beef cattle, forage, and row crop research. It is also home to the Calhoun Bull Evaluation and the Calhoun Heifer Evaluation and Reproductive Development (HERD) Programs. 

The main center is located in Rome, Georgia, but the office and Northwest Georgia Livestock Pavilion are located in Calhoun. Eight full-time and one part-time employees ensure that the Northwest Georgia Research and Education Center remains a facility that provides quality research opportunities. The Calhoun center also houses the Gordon County Extension Office and other college personnel.

About us


We investigate the latest production and technological practices, striving for producer profitability and sustainability.
Research and Education Centers (RECs) are hubs for innovation and discovery that address the most critical issues facing agricultural production throughout the state. Ultimately, our findings are shared with stakeholders through the extension and outreach efforts of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
An arched iceberg located along the Antarctic Peninsula, taken June 17. Last month Antarctic sea ice extent reached a record low for June, at 4.68 million square miles — or about 471,000 square miles below average. (Photo by Dan Costa/National Science Foundation/Creative Commons) CAES News
Rising temperatures mean significant impacts for Georgia
Halfway through 2022, Earth is on course for another top-10 finish in global temperature. After six months, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported that the period from January through June 2022 was the planet’s sixth warmest on record, with observations that go back to 1880. Antarctica also saw its lowest June ice coverage on record.
Robin Buell, GRA Eminent Scholar Chair in Crop Genomics, works in a plant growth chamber. Buell received nearly $800,000 in funding to study the genome of tepary bean in an effort to address climate-related difficulties faces in production of common bean. CAES News
UGA genomicist seeks to offset climate impacts on important food crop
The common bean — which includes many varieties of dry beans, from navy and black beans to red, pinto and green beans — are an important nutritional source for many world populations. However, rapidly changing climate conditions are making them increasingly difficult to grow in many locations due to high temperatures and susceptibility to diseases and pests.